Limerick TD says hold-ups in garda vetting delaying SNA appointments

first_imgPrint Twitter Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live NewsLimerick TD says hold-ups in garda vetting delaying SNA appointmentsBy Staff Reporter – January 20, 2017 698 Garda vetting delays are holding up the appointment of SNAsTHE appointment of Special Needs Assistants (SNAs) for schools all over Limerick is being delayed by hold ups in the Garda vetting system.Limerick Fianna Fáil TD Niall Collins, who is the party spokesman for Jobs and Enterprise, has warned that a growing backlog of Garda vetting applications will have a detrimental impact on schools over the coming months.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up And he says that the current vetting procedures for Special Needs Assistants (SNAs) needs to be overhauled to prevent duplication of work.“Specifically, a centralised database should be introduced to prevent the need for SNAs to go through the same vetting procedure on multiple occasions over a short period of time whenever they move schools.“Since the introduction of new legislation in 2015, there has been an unprecedented number of applications made through the Garda vetting system.“In the space of one year alone an additional 40,000 teachers have had to apply for Garda vetting,” Deputy Collins explained.“There are hundreds of SNA and teacher vetting applications still pending leaving a number of children with disabilities having to stay at home because their SNA has been unable to take up their position.“This is simply unacceptable and highlights the need to tackle problems associated with vetting. It’s unfair that children with disabilities are losing out on valuable time in school because of delays in processing vetting applications.He has called for reform of the system as there is no centralised record of SNAs that have been Garda vetted.“A database already exists for teachers that have been vetted, so there is no excuse for not having a similar database for SNAs adding that it needs to be a top priority for the Government,” he said. TAGSlimerickniall collinsSNAs Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Advertisement Email Linkedincenter_img Previous articleWin cinema ticketsNext articleLimerick court told former partner was making off with mortgage money Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Facebook Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads WhatsApplast_img read more

North Miami’s Haitian-American Councilman Alix Desulme presents at EcoTech Visions Digital…

first_imgOn February 7th, Haitian-American Councilman of North Miami, Alix Desulme, joined forces with celebrated, black woman CEO, Pandwe Gibson of Miami-based EcoTech Visions. The duo presented at Gibson’s EcoTech Visions Digital Citizen Bootcamp, which is currently running from January 7 – March 11 in Miami. The bootcamp is a free, comprehensive 8­-week intensive course on the practical use of a wide range of web-­based tools and applications necessary for the digital economy. The mission of the program is to close the digital divide, bridging the gap between the way people of different socioeconomic statuses access and use information technology and communication in their daily lives. The course will equip local participants with the skills needed to make use of technology within their communities. Students who have enrolled in the program represent a population that has been overlooked and disconnected from the digital economy. Many of the participants hail from a Jamaican, Haitian, Black American or Bahamian background, with 70% between the ages of 21 and 35. While Gibson imparted on the group the benefits of learning coding and its importance for the community’s economic development, Desulme explained why the city believes coding is the language of the future.“My colleagues and I on the North Miami City Council are committed to supporting workforce development initiatives,” he shared. “This is why we partnered with EcoTech Visions Foundation to provide free coding courses for our residents… our residents are learning fundamental skills such as computer programming and digital marketing. It is my hope that programs like these will provide high paying jobs for our residents in one of the fastest growing industries in the country.”Councilman Desulme was elected to the North Miami City Council representing District 4 in 2015. In 2016-2017 he became the youngest Councilman to serve as Vice Mayor for the city of North Miami. Councilman Desulme was first elected to office in 2009, in a city-wide election, making history as the first Black City Clerk of the City of North Miami. He also held the distinction of the youngest and first Haitian-American elected City Clerk in the United States.Gibson, the organizer of the bootcamp, is a graduate of MIT, Harvard and CGU Peter Drucker School of Management, and holds an MBA, MA and PhD. She founded EcoTech Visions to support spacetech, bluetech, big data, greentech, farmtech, Blockchain, saas, and consumer product startups. In 2018, Gibson led the EcoTech Visions team in successfully completing the Mergelane Fundinator in Boulder, Colorado and launched a $5 million seed round. The company’s signature “Farmers in the Gardens” program opened a second facility, giving EcoTech Visions a total of 52,000 square foot of space in Miami, housing 26 startups. The company plans to open five new facilities in Southeast and Midwestern America by 2020. This is just one of powerful African American/Caribbean American duos slated for the EcoTech Visions Digital Citizen Bootcamp. The program aims inspire and equip its audience of participants with the tools needed to themselves launch various successful careers and projects, despite the prevailing obstacles that minority populations face.last_img read more