Crowds flock to first Parks Legado farmers market of summer

first_img Jason Waters, right, explains pricing on baskets of vegetables at Walker Waters Urban Farms produce stand at Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Slap Your Mama It’s So Delicious Southern Squash CasseroleHawaiian Roll Ham SlidersUpside Down Blueberry Pie CheesecakePowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay WhatsApp Cowan Produce’s Gage Spencer, left, sells produce to George Baucom and his wife Lucy Baucom at Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Facebook Assorted baskets of vegetables are up for sale at Walker Waters Urban Farms produce stand at Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. John Skiles turned away from a pile of cardboard boxes, all labeled ‘PEACHES’ and stacked up as tall as him, before he swung his foot up to rest on another box in front of him.All empty.“I love it,” he smiled.Big crowds flocked through the first Parks Legado Farmers Market of the season on Saturday morning, all to take a look through vegetables, artisan goods, crafts, fruits like Skiles’ peaches and much more offered from about 70 local vendors. 2021 SCHOOL HONORS: Permian High School Carla Braden sorts out kernels from freshly made kettle popcorn at Mariposa Produce stand Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Then they left with armloads of buys, from what vendors called the biggest and best market at Parks Legado to kick off the center’s second summer running the event.“We had 36 boxes of peaches, and about 600 pounds of produce, and it’s gone in two hours,” Skiles said a little after 10 a.m. The market opened at 8 in the morning.“Last year, it was taking almost the whole market to sell everything, so for two hours — yeah, I guarantee this market has grown exponentially,” he added.The Parks Legado Farmers Market started last summer, with organizers presenting four events over the summer months, and the market’s back for another go-around this summer.Saturday’s event marked the first of four scheduled for this summer, all on the second Saturday of each month through September — and already, this year’s first market has grown bigger, busier and more successful than the event was last year, echoed vendor Lesli Kizer.Kizer, under the tent at her own booth, glanced over glass jars filled with colorful jams and jellies offered by her business We Be Jammin — or at least what was left.“We’ve been pretty busy,” she said. “We’re out of a whole bunch of flavors, but that’s a good problem to have.“It’s doubled in size,” she added, on the crowd of buyers attending Saturday. “It’s been awesome today.”Kizer sold jams, jellies, pickles and different condiments bottled by her local company that she started in 2013. Skiles sold some locally grown squash, zucchini and cherry tomatoes, along with peaches the family bought and trucked back from Weatherford on Friday.They were among the 70 or so vendors on hand Saturday, which is a number that’s grown this year right along with the number of shoppers. About 50 vendors came to the market during each session last summer, organizing official Andrew Marshall said last week, speaking for the Sewell Family of Companies which presents the event at the shopping center the organization built in 2013.One of those new, first-time vendors, Jason Waters, said he was impressed and excited by the crowds, under his tent and behind the banner Walker-Waters Urban Farm.“You could sell anything here,” Waters said, as a potential buyer looked through his onions. He sold locally grown onions, squash, tomatoes and potatoes, alongside his wife, Chelsea Waters, who offered bottles of lotion and more from the beauty shop in Odessa she owns called Glitz House of Beauty.Jason Waters raises vegetables on his land and at his father’s place, and usually just gives extras to his employees at W&W Energy, his business in the oil industry.“This time we were like, ‘Heck, let’s take it to the farmers market. It’ll be fun,’” Waters said.Across the plaza, Yolanda Hernandez, also of Odessa, offered samples of her spice called Porras’ Spices de Vida, in her and husband Oliver’s first time at the Parks Legado market.Yolanda said they had vended at the Odessa, Texas Farmers Market presented by Medical Center Hospital and at the Briar Patch Trade Days in town, and that they planned to be back at the Parks Legado market after Saturday.“There’s a lot of people here,” Hernandez said. “I think it’s going pretty well.”The next event at Parks Legado is set to open July 14 from 8 a.m. to noon at the town center located at 7260 East Highway 191. The center will also host markets on Aug. 14 and Sept. 8. The Parks Legado market advertises itself alongside MCH’s market, which opens next on June 23.“We love it. We’re all about the farmers market, because when we get a chance, we actually get to go and shop a little bit and get some more fresh fruits and veggies and things like that,” Kizer said.“But I like the fact that it brings everybody out. It’s the good, old-fashioned shopping.”Odessa farmers market scheduleParks Legado Farmers MarketDates: July 14, Aug. 11, Sept. 8When: 8 a.m. to noonWhere: Parks Legado Town Center, 7260 E. Highway 191 Local News Crowds flock to first Parks Legado farmers market of summer Vegetables at Farmer Troy’s produce stand at Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. MCH Odessa, Texas Farmers MarketDates: June 23, July 28, Aug. 25, Sept. 22When: 9 a.m. to noonWhere: MCH Main Campus, 3rd Street and Alleghaney Avenue By admin – June 9, 2018 WhatsApp Jacquel Cockrell, left, purchases a watermelon from Walker Waters at Walker Waters Urban Farms produce stand at Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Cowan Produce’s Gage Spencer, left, sells produce to George Baucom and his wife Lucy Baucom at Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Home Local News Crowds flock to first Parks Legado farmers market of summercenter_img Pinterest Attendees to Parks Legado Farmers Market browse vendors Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Parks Legado Farmers Market brings a large crowd of customers Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. ECISD undergoing ‘equity audit’ Quentin McKee, right, and Becky Leonard, center, purchase vegetables from Kyle and Sons’ produce stand at the Parks Legado Farmers Market last June at Parks Legado Town Center. 1 of 13 Peaches are up for sale at Kyle and Sons’ produce stand at the Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Pinterest Shirley Braden dumps a fresh batch of kettle popcorn out of the kettle at Mariposa Produce stand Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Facebook Twitter Previous articleGabe McDonald trial begins MondayNext articleTRACK AND FIELD: Athletes finish strong at West Texas Junior Olympics admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR OC employee of the year always learning Armiah Aguilar, 16, right, and her sister Cloe Aguilar make miniature doughnuts at Parks Legado Farmers Market Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Attendees to Parks Legado Farmers Market browse vendors Saturday morning at Parks Legado Town Center. Twitterlast_img read more

PR Insight: Why your credit union should run regular crisis drills in 2019

first_imgAt any given moment, a crisis can occur, often without warning and leaving long-lasting effects that can impact an organization’s reputation. From handling data breaches and growing cybercrime to scandals proliferated through social media, crisis communication planning is critical for your credit union and an integral part of the overall public relations function.But having a plan is only half the battle.Practice, Practice, Practice Typically, a crisis will only last a few days, but those few days can permanently damage your credit union’s reputation, making it crucial that you not only have a plan in place at all times, but that you practice that plan through regular drills and simulations.Consider the emergency fire drills we all practiced during our grade school years. Most of us probably never experienced a real school fire, but we were certainly prepared. The same principles should be applied to any organizational crisis—have a plan, and then practice, practice, practice. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Connie Cook – Sunman, Indiana

first_imgConnie (Moore) Cook, formerly of Sunman, Indiana, went home to be with the Lord on Wednesday, May 1, 2019 at St. Andrews Health Campus in Batesville.  She was 83.Connie was born in Owsley County Kentucky on March 1, 1936 to Bradley and Opal (Sandlin) Moore.  She married Hershel Wade Cook on July 23, 1955.  To this union, God would give one very extra ordinary and special son, Myron Wade Cook.Connie’s calling in life was to be “all” to her only child, Myron.  They were connected at the hip and heart!  Myron was born with Cerebral Palsy.  His life would be one full of “obstacles,” physical and mental.  In spite of that, his life was also filled with happiness, love, joy…and mostly anything he wanted.  Connie stated once that, “I’m so glad God gave me Myron, because He knew just what I needed. “  Connie would give birth to and care for that son for 54 years.  She knew he was her life’s purpose and with God’s help she fulfilled it to the utmost.She has finally been reunited with Myron and Hershel.  What a blessing she was to all who knew her.  Most of all, as a Christian her life was a testimony to God’s boundless love, grace and provision in all circumstances.  She will be sorely missed by her family and friends.  She is survived by her siblings, Denny (Sharon) Moore and Glenda Adams, both of Sunman, and Curtis (Vivian) Moore of West Harrison, Indiana. and half brother Phillip (Louise) Meece of Lewisville, OH.  Also surviving; nieces, Sandy (Tim) Oxley, Amber (Todd) Mays; nephews, Donnie (Linda) Stall, Tim (Laura) Moore and Brad Moore, and many great nieces and nephews.  In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her husband, Hershel, her son Myron, brothers-in-law Woody Adams and Carl (Buck) Stall, and her sister, Aliene Stall.Friends may visit with the family on Saturday, May 4, 2019 at Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home, 107 Vine Street, Sunman from 10 a.m. until 12 noon.  Funeral services, led by Pastor Kelly Barnes, will begin at 12 noon.  Burial will follow in St. Paul Cemetery.  In lieu of flowers, memorials may be directed to The Gideon’s International or to Hope Baptist Church.  To sign the online guestbook or to leave a personal condolence, please visit www.cookrosenberger.com.  Cook Rosenberger Funeral Home is honored to care for the family of Connie Cook.last_img read more