Product tampering leads to sausage recall

first_imgWashington D.C. — Monogram Meat Snacks, LLC, a Martinsville, Va. establishment, is recalling approximately 191,928 pounds of ready-to-eat pork sausage products that may be adulterated due to possible product contamination, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) announced today. This recall is being initiated due to product tampering, following the production process.The ready-to-eat pork sausages are heat-treated and shelf-stable. The items were produced and packaged for Conagra Brand / Duke’s Meats Corp. on various dates between Jan. 16 and March 7, 2019.  The following products are subject to recall: [View Labels (PDF only)]5-oz. plastic pouches of “DUKE’S HICKORY PEACH BBQ SMOKED SHORTY SAUSAGES, Made with A PEACH BBQ RELISH,” that contain a package and case code of 1580002003, and various BEST IF USED BY dates from Jan. 16, 2019 through Jan. 27, 2020.5-oz. plastic pouches of “DUKE’S HOT & SPICY SMOKED SHORTY SAUSAGES, Made with FRESH-DICED SERRANO PEPPERS,” that contain a package and case code of 1601201052, and various BEST IF USED BY dates from Jan. 16, 2020 through Feb. 3, 2020.16-oz. plastic pouches of “DUKE’S ORIGINAL RECIPE SMOKED SHORTY SAUSAGES, Made with A CLASSIC BLEND OF SPICES & FRESHLY-CHOPPED HERBS,” that contain a package code of 1601201182, various BEST IF USED BY dates from Jan. 11, 2020 through Feb. 27, 2020, and a case code of 1580002130.5-oz. plastic pouches of “DUKE’S CAJUN STYLE ANDOUILLE SMOKED SHORTY SAUSAGES, Made with ROASTED RED PEPPERS & CAJUN SPICES,” that contain a package and case code of 1580002073, and various BEST IF USED BY dates from Jan. 10, 2020 through Feb. 13, 2020.5-oz. plastic pouches of “DUKE’S ORIGINAL RECIPE SMOKED SHORTY SAUSAGES, Made with A CLASSIC BLEND OF SPICES & FRESHLY-CHOPPED HERBS,” that contain a product and case code of 1601201051, and various BEST IF USED BY dates from Feb. 14, 2020 through Feb. 29, 2020.5-oz. plastic pouches of “DUKE’S HATCH GREEN CHILE SMOKED SHORTY SAUSAGES, Made with ROASTED & DICED HATCH CHILES,” that contain a package and case code of 1580002002, and various BEST IF USED BY dates from Jan. 13, 2020 through Feb. 3, 2020.5-oz. plastic pouches of “DUKE’S ORIGINAL RECIPE SMOKED SHORTY SAUSAGES, Made with A CLASSIC BLEND OF SPICES & FRESHLY-CHOPPED HERBS,” that contain a package code of 1601201051, various BEST IF USED BY dates from Feb. 17, 2020 through March 1, 2020, and a case code 1601201272.5-oz. plastic pouches of “DUKE’S HOT & SPICY SMOKED SHORTY SAUSAGES, Made with FRESH-DICED SERRANO PEPPERS,” that contain a package code of 1601201052, various BEST IF USED BY dates from Jan. 16, 2020 through Feb. 24, 2020, and a case code of 1601201274.The products subject to recall bear establishment number “EST. 795” inside the USDA mark of inspection. These items were shipped to retail locations nationwide.The problem was discovered on March 11, 2019 when the establishment confirmed that the product was distributed into U.S. commerce.There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness should contact a healthcare provider.Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them. These products should be thrown away or returned to the place of purchase.last_img read more

SA art gallery looks back 100 years

first_imgPortrait of Kalie by Maggie Laubser will also be exhibited. (Image: Johannesburg Art Gallery) The Johannesburg Art Gallery (JAG) is marking a 100 years of art-collecting with an elaborate celebration and launch of a new catalogue detailing the various works in its possession.The event will take place at the gallery in Joubert Park, Johannesburg, on 28 November 2010 at 5pm. The public is welcome to attend and entrance is free.The catalogue, called One Hundred Years of Collecting: Johannesburg Art Gallery, as well as the launch celebration have been sponsored by the South African division of Anglo American.The gallery will mark another centenary in 2015, when an upgrade of its building will be completed. The art-collection celebration precedes this, as the establishment began accumulating works long before the actual building was constructed.The catalogue features essays by South African writers and artists Khwezi Gule, Nessa Leibhammer and Bongi Dhlomo, among others. It has been edited by Jillian Carman, who is an honorary research fellow at the universities of the Witwatersrand and Johannesburg, and a former JAG curator.“We are celebrating the historic feat by launching a catalogue with essays about collections within the gallery,” said Antoinette Murdoch, the gallery’s curator.“The individual essays are about the gallery’s traditional, historic and contemporary art collections.“The launch is an open invitation event and we are expecting close to 600 people,” she added.Impact on local, global art community“The gallery’s collections have had a significant impact on the local and global art community,” Carman said. “Although initially focusing on western artists, in 1994 a decision was taken to consolidate the South African collections.”These collections are made up of traditional items, modern and contemporary art – including work by international artists with South African links like Marlene Dumas –and artists from other African countries, like the late Nigerian photographer Oluwarotimi (Rotimi) Fani-Kayode.“The purpose of this is to build on JAG’s unique strength: it is ideally placed to be a major international centre and archive of South African art within the country,” Carman added.“JAG is committed to preserving and providing access to our national heritage and giving due recognition to South Africa’s neglected artists through our exhibitions, publications and education programmes,” according to a media statement released by the gallery.“The gallery is the cultural backbone of Johannesburg and our collection has served to open dialogue and make a path for meaningful, intellectual and academic debate, ultimately contributing to change and impacting on society at large,” the statement continued.Diverse line-upThe celebrations on 28 November will centre around an exhibition by women artists called Transformations. Other works displayed in the Foundation Room and pieces belonging to the Matters of Spirit permanent exhibition will also be on view, and there will be a video projection of local artist Stephen Hobbs’ work.Transformations focuses on the various changes women have experienced in the last century and reflects this through artistic works.“Lace-making, embroidery, ceramics, tapestry and beadwork were among the activities women were largely involved in at the turn of the 19th century. However, since the mid-1900s, women artists have developed an increasingly confident and critical vision that is manifested in their subject matter and mode of production,” the JAG statement added.Transformations includes work from the gallery’s various collections that explore this shifting vision. “The idea is to show how women’s place in society has changed,” Murdoch said.The projection by Hobbs will focus on new and old buildings in Johannesburg, and how they can serve as places for aesthetic and political contemplation.History of the JAGIn total, the JAG has 15 exhibition halls and various sculptured gardens. It houses collections of 17th century Dutch paintings, 18th and 19th century British and European art, 19th century South African works, a large contemporary collection of 20th century local and international art, and a print cabinet containing works from the 15th century to the present.The building was designed and built at the beginning of the 20th by British architect Edwin Lutyens. Art dealer Sir Hugh Lane and Florence Phillips, an art collector, established the first gallery collection from funds given by Phillips’ husband, Lionel, who was a mining magnate at the time.Phillips donated her lace collection, and arranged for her husband to donate seven oil paintings and an Auguste Rodin sculpture.Today, JAG’s collection includes further works by Rodin, as well as pieces by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Pablo Picasso, Camille Pissarro, Claude Monet, Edgar Degas and Henry Moore.There are also works by South African masters like Gerard Sekoto, Walter Battiss, Alexis Preller, Maud Sumner, Sydney Kumalo, Ezrom Legae and Pierneef.The collection is so large that the gallery only exhibits 10% of it at any given time, with the remainder in storage. With generous sponsorship from Anglo American and the City of Johannesburg, and with the help of a trust fund, the gallery is able to regularly acquire new works.last_img read more

The meaning of heritage

first_imgThe Constitutional Court is one of South Africa’s new heritage buildings.(Image: Lucille Davie)MEDIA CONTACTS • Sonwabile MancotywaChief Executive Officer, National Heritage Council+27 12 348 1663.RELATED ARTICLES• Ubuntu is about relationships• South Africa’s heritage is world class• Parenting a Nation Lucille DavieHeritage is a hugely complex and nebulous concept, with its meaning and relevance varying from person to person.The National Heritage Council of South Africa (NHC) is embarking on a project to involve the public in defining the concept. It offers the following as a starting point: “Heritage is what is preserved from the past as the living collective memory of a people not only to inform the present about the past but also to equip successive generations to fashion their future. It is what creates a sense of identity and assures rootedness and continuity, so that what is brought out by dynamism of culture is not changed for its own sake, but it is a result of people’s conscious choice to create a better life.”The NHC is a statutory body falling under the Department of Arts and Culture. It is responsible for the preservation of the country’s heritage. Established in 2004, its vision is to “build a nation proud of its African heritage”. To this end it sets out to “transform, protect and promote South African heritage for sustainable development”.“We are committed to make knowledge about our heritage available to the public,” says NHC chief executive Sonwabile Mancotywa. “The country can build the pride of its people by at least appreciating our successes. The history that defines these successes of our nation is important to our heritage. These moments in history, the features of our nature and culture as well as the objects that signify gratifying and irreversible turning points in our lifetime, are permanent traits of our pride.”It aims to create public awareness of and promote education about heritage, and make funding available for projects that make heritage a socio-economic resource.Professor Kathy Munro, honorary associate professor in the school of architecture and planning at Wits University, defines heritage as legacies from the past. She says heritage could be physical objects such as buildings or artefacts, or cultural such as language or customs, or books, or songs, or shared traditions. “There are many different forms of heritage, depending on the discipline, for example, science, culinary, literary, architectural, musical, etc.” She emphasises that heritage is not the same as history. “Heritage is broader and sometimes less analytical in approach and recognition than history. History is about interpretation and the survival of documentation or written evidence; heritage is about identity.”Professor Muxe Nkondo of the NHC says we should look to the Constitution to define heritage. The six freedoms in the Constitution should be the basis of our heritage: freedom and security of the person; freedom of religion, belief and opinion; freedom of expression; freedom of association; freedom of movement and residence; freedom of trade, occupation and profession. “We should celebrate those who fought for our freedom – those values and principles are our heritage. We should remember things in our past that embody the best things of our past.” He stresses that all South Africans should decide what is best about our past, not just parliamentarians.Unique and preciousIn its preamble, the National Heritage Resources Act of 1999 states that our heritage is unique and precious and cannot be renewed. “It helps us to define our cultural identity and therefore lies at the heart of our spiritual well-being and has the power to build our nation. It has the potential to affirm our diverse cultures, and in so doing shape our national character.”It has a healing quality too, states the Act. It celebrates our achievements and contributes to redressing past inequities. It also educates by deepening our understanding of society and encourages us to empathise with the experiences of others. “It facilitates healing and material and symbolic restitution and it promotes new and previously neglected research into our rich oral traditions and customs.”And, says Munro, our heritage is constantly being created. She cites as an example our new flag. “It is an enormously successful point of new identity for post-1994 South Africans. Heritage is created through growing awareness of the presence and survival of past legacies, artefacts, objects.”National estateThe Act indicates that our heritage is part of the national estate – the listing of all our heritage resources – which may include a range of objects:• Places, buildings, structures and equipment of cultural significance;• Places to which oral traditions are attached or which are associated with living heritage;• Historical settlements and townscapes;• Landscapes and natural features of cultural significance;• Geological sites of scientific or cultural importance;• Archaeological and palaeontological sites;• Graves and burial grounds;• Sites of significance relating to the history of slavery in South Africa; and,• Movable objects like ethnographic art, military objects, decorative or fine art objects, books, records, documents, photographic positives and negatives, film or video material, or sound recordings.The national estate may include a place or object that has cultural significance or other special value because of its importance in the community; its possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of South Africa’s natural or cultural heritage; its potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding of South Africa’s natural or cultural heritage; its strong or special association with a particular community or cultural group for social, cultural or spiritual reasons; its strong association with the life or work of a person, group or organisation of importance in the history of South Africa; and sites of significance relating to the history of slavery in South Africa.Heritage resourcesA heritage resource is any place or object of cultural significance, according to the Act. “Heritage resources have lasting value in their own right and provide evidence of the origins of South African society and as they are valuable, finite, non-renewable and irreplaceable they must be carefully managed to ensure their survival,” it indicates.It goes further to state that heritage resources “contribute to research, education and tourism and they must be developed and presented for these purposes in a way that ensures dignity and respect for cultural values”.Furthermore, the identification and management of heritage resources must take account of cultural values and indigenous knowledge systems, involving the least possible alteration or loss of them. The use and enjoyment of and access to heritage resources, consistent with their significance and conservation needs, must be promoted. These resources must be fully researched, documented and recorded for use by present and future generations.Heritage criteriaThe Act gives criteria that can be used to judge the heritage significance of an object: social and cultural significance; historical; archaeological; architectural; aesthetic; scientific and technological; group and relationship; and landmark significance. To judge the significance of our heritage, the Act specifies a three-tiered management system. The South African Heritage Resources Agency has overall responsibility for heritage resources of national significance. Each province has a provincial heritage resources authority, to manage resources within the province. And, on a local level, municipalities are responsible for managing and protecting heritage resources worthy of conservation.The provincial authorities are obliged to develop registers of heritage sites and investigate their cultural significance, and will look to local authorities for relevant heritage information.Regarding buildings, general protection is given to all buildings built before 1942, in other words, buildings older than 60 years. A permit is required for alteration or demolition of buildings older than 60 years. This does not mean that all buildings over 60 years are worthy of preservation – they have to have cultural, historical or architectural significance. Examples of these are Mandela House in Soweto, Robben Island Prison, Houses of Parliament in Cape Town, Union Buildings in Pretoria, the Fort in Cape Town, or Liliesleaf Farm buildings in Johannesburg.Alternatively, buildings younger than 60 years may have great historical importance, and should therefore be preserved. Examples include the Constitutional Court in Johannesburg, Apartheid Museum and Hector Pieterson Museum, both in Johannesburg, and Freedom Park outside Pretoria.Importance of heritageThe importance of heritage cannot be underestimated. It affects land use applications and building plan approvals, and therefore needs to be co-ordinated with development planning, building control, law enforcement and other functions.In addition, there are economic benefits to pursuing a proactive preservation policy. Building rehabilitation outperforms manufacturing and new construction when it comes to job creation, as well as creating a capital asset in the form of the rehabilitated building. Secondly, heritage tourism is the fastest growing segment of the tourism industry. Heritage tourists should be encouraged as they visit more places, stay longer and spend more money than other tourists.There are still other benefits – historic properties can play a role in providing housing which is affordable, safe and attractive. In addition, small businesses often find the quality accommodation at reasonable prices offered by rehabilitated buildings ideal.“Heritage is positioned as an agent of social change, reconstruction and development,” says Eric Itzkin, the deputy director of immovable heritage in Johannesburg. Certainly the preservation of buildings in downtown Joburg is a key element in the revitalisation of the city, as well as in providing necessary jobs.In the City of Johannesburg’s 2004 policy document, Itzkin wrote: “Heritage is widely acknowledged to have an important potential as a catalyst for development. Johannesburg’s heritage resources should therefore be marshalled in support of the City’s long-term development goals and 2030 Strategy. The challenge is not only to preserve historic resources, but also to use them as positive instruments for growth and change.”World Heritage sitesSouth Africa has been recognised by Unesco, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation, which has declared eight World Heritage Sites in the country, reflecting its rich natural resources and incredible beauty. Four of South Africa’s World Heritage Sites are classified as cultural, three as natural and one as a mixed cultural and natural site.The three natural heritage sites are the iSimangaliso (formerly the Greater St Lucia) Wetland Park in KwaZulu-Natal; the Cape Floral Region in Western Cape; and the Vredefort Dome in Free State. The four cultural sites are the Mapungubwe Cultural Landscape in Limpopo; Robben Island off Cape Town; the Cradle of Humankind in Gauteng and North West; and the Richtersveld Cultural and Botanical Landscape in Northern Cape. The uKhahlamba Drakensberg Park in KwaZulu-Natal is the mixed cultural and natural site, with both the highest mountain range in Africa south of Kilimanjaro and the continent’s finest concentration of Bushmen rock art.The NHC is on a drive to get people involved in defining their heritage, and reflecting on what needs to be remembered and what forgotten, and who should speak for the past. Perhaps the University of Massachusetts in the US sums it up best: “Heritage is an essential part of the present we live in – and of the future we will build.”last_img read more

10 months agoReal Madrid captain Ramos: We don’t miss Ronaldo

first_imgReal Madrid captain Ramos: We don’t miss Ronaldoby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveReal Madrid captain Sergio Ramos insists they do not miss former teammate Cristiano Ronaldo.Ronaldo left Real in August for Juventus.Preparing for their Club World Cup defence, Ramos insists they don’t miss the Portuguese.”I think that on the field there will not be much difference, despite the absence of Cristiano Ronaldo, who was a decisive player for us, but we are going to compete with the same philosophy as always in the club: to win,” explained Ramos.”We have good memories of this competition, because we have been successful on previous occasions, it is a short competition and there is no margin for error, there is a semifinal and then a final, and we want to take the cup back home.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

a month agoLiverpool veteran Milner hails Jones and young teammates: They’re pushing us

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Liverpool veteran Milner hails Jones and young teammates: They’re pushing usby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool veteran James Milner fears the club’s top kids are set to send him into retirement.Milner explained he and his senior team-mates are constantly pushing the likes of Harvey Elliott, Curtis Jones, Ki-Jana Hoever and Rhian Brewster to step up into the first team.“They showed how good they are and the more games they get they will only get better and better,” he said of the performance at MK Dons.“They’re pushing and that is what the senior boys need – competition for places. That’s what we want, and hopefully we can help push them and they can keep pushing us.”On Jones, Milner said: “I’ve seen a massive difference in Curtis in the last year. He’s always had that ability but seems a bit more mature now; [he’s] defending well, getting his angles right when he’s defending.”There are times when you need to encourage but also times where you need a rocket as well. Like I say, over the last year I’ve seen that difference in him. I think he’s realised as well that if you want to play for Liverpool, that’s as important as the stuff on the ball.”Not only that, he’s got so much ability and skills and tricks, and it’s about using them in the right area. I think he’s learning that more and more now – you don’t want him doing it on the halfway line, you want him getting hold of it in the final third.”That’s where you do your tricks and get people in the box. I said to him before the game, ‘I wouldn’t want to defend you in the box, so get them in there and drive at them’. He’s got great ability.” last_img read more

Free Grant writing workshop for farmers

first_imgTeaming with the help of the Peace River Regional District and Adlard Enviromental, by hosting the free grant writing workshop for farmers is a valuable opportunity to listen to and ask questions of a Grant Writer.This presentation will be an asset to those attending by learning and developing valuable skills, tools and confidence as well as learning what grants are available through the year to for-profit farm businesses to help prepare your own grant proposals.The event is Thursday January 10, 2019, 5:30 pm – 7:30 pmFor more details go to the Facebook Event Page CLICK HERE FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – After many conversations between local farmers and NEAT’s Northern Co-Hort, the free Grant Writing Workshop is a response to the information received from these producers.The Northern Co-hort felt there was a need to get an event such as this together after connecting with over 70 Producers in the Region since October. After holding three Northern Connections Farmers Events there was the opportunity for open dialogue and the opportunity to talk about real issues such as how are producers farming, where are they farming, maximizing earning potential and where can producers use support.Bess Legault, Northern Co-hort Coordinator with NEAT shared “The feedback was that farmers were aware there are grants available to a for-profit producer from the Government yet they don’t know how to access the money or how to write the grant.”last_img read more

Teen offered lift raped by cabbie

first_imgGurugram: In a shocking incident, a 15-year-old girl was raped in Gurugram on the pretext of offering her a lift. The alleged incident took place on Saturday at IFFCO Chowk. The victim was raped by her cab driver. The Gurugram police is investigating the case.The teenager victim, a resident of Mahipalpur area in Delhi, works with food caterers. The victim was allegedly raped by a cab driver on the pretext of offering her a lift. According to police, the victim had gone to work at a wedding on the Old Delhi Road. The victim was accompanied by three other girls. After finishing her work, the victim went looking for transport to return to Delhi. A cab with two people already in it offered them a lift. The four girls entered the car and sat on the back seat. Also Read – Bangla Sahib Gurudwara bans use of all types of plastic itemsThe victim alleged that the cab driver dropped the person sitting on the first seat at Shankar Chowk before driving to a secluded area. She added that the cab driver locked the three other women inside the car and then raped her. Following this, he dropped the four women near Mahipalpur and warned them against informing the police. The Delhi Police registered a zero FIR and transferred the case to the Gurugram Police. The police registered a case again at the DLF-2 station. Section 6 of the Protection of Children from Sexual Offences (POCSO) Act was added to the FIR. Gurugram along with its counterpart Faridabad is leading in terms of sexual crimes against minors. In 2017, 106 cases of sexual crimes against minors were reported while in 2016 it was 115.last_img read more

PM splurges on publicity to hide failures Mayawati

first_imgLucknow: Bahujan Samaj Party (BSP) supremo Mayawati on Saturday accused Prime Minister Narendra Modi of wasting public money for self promotion.The former Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister tweeted: “Modi was busy mostly in laying foundation stones for various projects. He has spent Rs 3,044 crore on publicity.”Instead, this government could have used this money for education and better medical facilities in every village of backward states like Uttar Pradesh. Also Read – Squadrons which participated in Balakot air strike awarded citations on IAF Day”However, for the BJP, there is no greater emphasis that is needed than on itself.”The tweets of the 63-year-old Dalit leader was in Hindi. “BJP and PM are hell bent on deflecting the attention of people from the failures of their government,” she added.The ruling party at the Centre, which is also at the helm in her state has “miserably failed to address serious issues like unemployment and poverty”, she said. “They run away from any kind of public debate,” she added.Cautioning people from falling into the BJP’s trap, Mayawati said these were mere tactics to divert people’s attention from the real issues in public discourse.The BJP was also “digging up all sorts of skeletons in cupboards” of opposition parties, she pointed out, and condemned the ploy.last_img read more

Cincinnati Reds pitching coach Bryan Price named manager

The Cincinnati Reds decided to hire in-house to its open managerial position.The club’s front office announced the promotion of pitching coach Bryan Price to manager at a Tuesday press conference. News of the hire first surfaced Monday night on Twitter from Fox’s Ken Rosenthal.Reds General Manager and President of Baseball Operations Walt Jocketty said Tuesday that despite a long list of candidates, he and the rest of the front office did not interview anyone else for the job.“Once we had the meeting with Bryan, we saw no reason to go forward (with other candidates),” Jocketty said at the press conference.The club’s CEO, Bob Castellini, described Price as “exceptional,” and said if the Reds did not hire Price, he likely would be heading elsewhere.The two sides agreed to a three-year contract running through 2016.Price, the 61st manager in team history, steps in for Dusty Baker who was relieved of his duties Oct. 3 after the Reds lost six consecutive games to close out 2013, including the National League Wild Card Game against the Pittsburgh Pirates.Baker went 509-463 (.524) during his six seasons in Cincinnati; he took his team to the postseason in three of the past four years.Price has served as the Reds’ pitching coach since 2010. During the 2013 regular season, the Reds’ pitching staff owned the MLB’s fourth-best ERA and led the NL in strikeouts. The year before, Price’s repertoire of bullpen arms led the Majors in saves (56) and was fourth in ERA (3.34). The 2012 Reds’ starting pitchers became just the eighth rotation in MLB history with five pitchers making at least 30 starts each.Price, who has never managed at the professional level, pitched as high as AAA in the minor leagues and served as the pitching coach for both the Mariners’ (2000-2005) and Diamondbacks (2006-2009) before coming to Cincinnati.The San Francisco, Calif., native interviewed for the Miami Marlins’ managerial vacancy last offseason, and was rumored to be a possible candidate for the Seattle Mariners current opening at the position.Starting pitcher Bronson Arroyo, who becomes a free agent as soon as the World Series ends, told the Cincinnati Enquirer how he felt his former pitching coach would do as a replacement when news broke of Baker’s firing.“I think he’d be unbelievable,” Arroyo said. “He’s as organized as anyone in the game; he holds people as accountable as well as anyone I’ve seen. He doesn’t buy into stereotypical things in the game … Price looks at evidence. He’s a freaking smart guy, he makes his decision on reasonable evidence. Sometimes in baseball we go by hunches, what someone else said or the way things have gone in the past. He doesn’t do that.”According to a September article at mlb.com, Reds’ starting pitcher Homer Bailey also had positive things to say about Price’s ability to hold people accountable, an area some feel Baker struggled with.“We are held accountable,” Bailey said. “We demand certain things out of everyone here, whether you’re the No. 1 starter on the team or the mop-up guy, it doesn’t matter. Our expectations are held so high. Some things are just unacceptable. Our starters are expected to go seven innings. We are expected to keep our team in the game. We are expected to put up quality starts.”Price thanked Baker during Tuesday’s press conference, saying “he became a friend and confidant.”Jocketty said other coaching staff decisions for vacant roles have not yet been made.Price will join John Farrell of the Red Sox and the Padres’ Bud Black as the only active managers who were previously a pitching coach. read more

Football Samuels stock rises Browns falls after NFL Combine

OSU junior H-back Curtis Samuel (4) celebrates as he scores a rushing touchdown in second overtime to win the game for the Buckeyes on Nov. 26 at Ohio Stadium. The Buckeyes won 30-27. Credit: Mason Swires | Assistant Photo EditorAlthough the Ohio State football team will not be breaking records in the NFL Draft like it did last season, there are still eight former Buckeyes who are vying for the chance to play at the highest level in 2017. After the 2017 NFL Combine, a few of those players might be hearing their names called a little earlier after solid workouts. However, it isn’t positive for all OSU’s hopefuls.Center/Guard Pat ElfleinPrediction: Pick 114 (Washington Redskins)Pat Elflein’s switch to center worked well for the Pickerington, Ohio, native. A starter for 40 consecutive games and the indisputable anchor of the Buckeyes on the offensive line last season, Elflein mentored now-redshirt senior Billy Price, who will be following in his teammate’s footsteps next season by sliding over from guard to center.At the combine, Elflein looked leaner, with a more slim yet powerful frame. Even with a body that appeared much more in shape, Elflein managed just 22 reps, a rather low number for an offensive lineman.Elflein was not pleased.“It’s OK for right now,” he told the media. “But I’m going to do more at pro day.”While his stock might drop slightly because of less-than-stellar testing, Elflein is a workhorse who can bring a lot to an NFL franchise. Although he is known to have short arms for an interior lineman and lack some fundamental strength, he can still be a late steal.Wide receiver Curtis SamuelPrediction: Pick 37 (Los Angeles Rams)Curtis Samuel did not have the best hands last season, and had a habit of dropping passes. Regardless, Samuel entered the combine as a wide receiver rather than a running back, and showed off his most valuable skill: his speed.Samuel put in a blazing 4.31 40-yard dash time, the second best mark behind only John Ross of Washington, who ran an absurd 4.22 dash time. It was the fastest time of any Buckeye at the combine ever.It remains to be seen where Samuel actually ends up playing in the NFL. His 18 reps on bench press are a relatively high number for a wide receiver and predict his ability to create separation, but would also show his ability to bounce off tackles in the NFL as a running back.Regardless, Samuel earned himself quite a pay-bump with his quick feet.Linebacker Raekwon McMillanPrediction: Pick 53 (Detroit Lions)A leader in the middle of the OSU defense for three years, Raekwon McMillan is another example of a quality linebacker from Columbus. With more than 100 tackles in his senior season alone, McMillan showed his ability to be a reliable and formidable force in the middle on run defense. As a player who is wise beyond his years, McMillan’s ability to drop back in coverage and chase down ball carriers are the biggest questions ahead of the 2017 NFL Draft. One thing that can’t be questioned is the leadership of McMillan.“Everything we did on defense (at OSU) came through me,” he said. “I can do the same thing for their program. I’m never gonna give you a reason to let me go from the team, and I’ll always be a leader … never a follower.”With 23 reps on bench press, and a solid 4.61 time in the 40-yard dash, it seems strange that fans and coaches still question the ability of the Georgia native. Still, the combine is not an actual game. McMillan will be able to play at the next level, but will still have to prove himself at OSU’s pro day. Any team that takes a chance on him will likely benefit from one of the most intelligent and mature players in the draft, but that team might have to wait a year or two before he develops into a well-rounded middle linebacker.But when he is fully developed, McMillan could be one of the league’s best.Cornerback Marshon LattimorePrediction: Pick 12 (Cleveland Browns)Marshon Lattimore went through lingering hamstring injuries throughout his college career before having a stellar year in 2016, picking up four interceptions and returning one for a touchdown. And yet, every team still seemed hung up on his hamstring. Lattimore said he was asked multiple times about his hamstring, often with the question being the first thing asked.After an x-ray signaled he was fine, Lattimore reported injured his hamstring again, but he said it was hip flexor.Before the apparent injury, Lattimore ran a 4.36 40-yard dash, which showed his hamstring was in order (later ruined by reports of another injury). Lattimore has speed, and has the ability to play zone and press coverage, but his health is a major question mark. Still, Lattimore is confident.“At Ohio State, they prepare you the best, I feel like,” Lattimore said. “We perform in college, and then we perform in the league.”A team is going to take a shot at him in the first round, but the question is, who will be willing to take on the risk of a cornerback who can’t stay on the field?Punter Cameron Johnston Prediction: Pick 247 (Green Bay Packers)It’s hard to judge punters in combine testing. Most of what is known about a special teamer is established well before the combine.In Cameron Johnston’s case, he was one of three punters to run the 40-yard dash, and posted the slowest time among specialists of 4.92 seconds. This isn’t exactly an important stat for punters, but it’s worth noting.Johnston is a rugby-style punter who can really boot the ball deep, and could add a nice twist to a team looking for a proven player at the position. He won’t be taken off the board until late, if at all due to the fact he plays a position that is extremely undervalued. Safety Malik HookerPrediction: Pick 7 (Los Angeles Chargers)“The Freak” proved all doubters wrong in 2016 after coming into Columbus as a somewhat forgotten about three-star recruit. He dominated college football as a ball-hawking safety who could hit as hard as a linebacker. A powerfully built frame, and hands like a wide receiver, Malik Hooker is easily one of the top-10 best players in the entire draft. Offseason surgeries have limited his ability to show off his talent at the combine, but his draft stock has not fallen far.A sports hernia surgery and a procedure to repair a labrum in his hip have slowed Hooker temporarily, but he told reporters at the combine that  he played through the injury during the Fiesta Bowl.“That was never a thought,” Hooker said. “Just because I put too much work in with those guys. It would be like I’m letting them down.”Hooker will still remain a top-10 selection in the draft, even though he will have to wait until rookie camp to actually contribute and work towards playing. Cornerback Gareon ConleyPrediction: Pick 31 (Atlanta Falcons)Gareon Conley is the man people forget from the OSU secondary in this draft, which is disappointing considering he is a quality player and one of the top cornerbacks in a cornerback-heavy class. He solidified that with a solid 4.44 40-yard dash time.In skills drills, Conley was right up there with the cornerbacks who were considered leaps ahead of him, and had a good enough showing to make him seem like a potential pick in the first half of the first round.This likely won’t happen for Conley, as teams have bought into the hype of his former teammates Lattimore and Alabama standout Marlon Humphrey. But his testing at the combine, paired with a career of success with the Buckeyes, shows how much Conley can bring to any team that selects him.Conley is projected to drop out of the first round, but that isn’t stopping him.“I don’t worry about it, but I try to motivate myself to get there,” he said. “I definitely want to be a first-round pick. Nobody doesn’t want to be a first-round pick, so I’m going to work as hard as I can to be a first-round pick.”His solid testing and positive attitude just might have gotten him there.Wide receiver Noah BrownPrediction: Pick 83 (Tennessee Titans)Noah Brown’s decision to leave OSU early was a surprise to many. He hopped on the hype train of players leaving after one solid year of production.Only problem, Brown’s numbers were not solid.With the exception of his absurd four-touchdown night against Oklahoma early in the season, Brown did not show much of anything to demonstrate he is going to make a difference in the NFL. The big-bodied receiver has the size to produce, but has far too many question marks to give him a clear distinction as a top-ranked wide receiver.Brown had a solid 19 reps on the bench press, but did not run the 40-yard dash, electing to wait until OSU’s pro day on March 23 to show off his speed. This draft is deep enough at receiver that Brown needed to wow in order to draw more interest. His body and strength alone have given him some consideration for teams desperate for wide receiver, but Brown could not have done himself any favors in the combine. read more