RIP: Retired Bishop Daniel L. Swenson dies

first_img Featured Jobs & Calls Comments are closed. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC People Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Smithfield, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT RIP: Retired Bishop Daniel L. Swenson dies Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Comments (1) An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted May 30, 2014 Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA May 30, 2014 at 9:39 pm Were he able, my husband would be the first to express his gratitude for Dan Swenson. They were comrades in New England sharing a love of place and people. Dan had his priorities in order and was very wise and ever thoughtful and caring. He and Sally were a team I felt privileged to call friends. Together we shared the sacraments of joy and laughter. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Jane (Sue) Theuner says: An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Obituary, Curate Diocese of Nebraska New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Events Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal News Service] The Rt. Rev. Daniel L. Swenson, eighth bishop of Vermont, died May 24. A private service with his family took place May 29 (Ascension Day) in Northfield, Minnesota.Swenson leaves behind family and countless friends whose hearts and lives have been warmed by his friendship and laughter. Following Swenson’s ordination in the Episcopal Church in 1960, he and his wife Sally lived in a number of towns in Minnesota including Minnetonka Beach, Wayzata, Virginia, Eveleth, Faribault, and White Bear Lake. In 1986 they moved to Burlington, Vermont, when he was elected the eighth bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Vermont and was active in the wider Episcopal Church.Following his retirement as bishop of Vermont in 1993, Swenson and his wife moved to Forest Lake, Minnesota. He was invited to serve as assisting bishop with the Rt. Rev. James L. Jelinek for 13 years. He knew the history of Minnesota and the Episcopal Church in Minnesota and was happy studying the Gospel of John and teaching. Having been raised in the shadow of the Holocaust and World War II, he worked passionately to educate and transform himself in the areas of institutional racism and civil rights. He was a strong advocate for the ordination of women, prevention of clergy sexual abuse and the full inclusion of gay and lesbian people.In 2003, the Swensons relocated to Northfield to be closer to their family. There they were part of All Saints Church, Northfield, a community of faith that welcomed and embraced their presence and ministry. The Rev. Gayle Mardine Marsh is the rector at All Saints and was very close to the Swensons.Swenson was preceded in death by his parents, siblings and his wife, who died on Dec. 25, 2012. Immediate family includes: children Martha (Dennis Joyner) Swenson of Vadnais Heights; Sara (Willie Jr.) Shuford of Minneapolis; Daniel (Kathleen Hanscom) Swenson of Northfield; 10 grandchildren and five great grandchildren. Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET last_img read more

SOFII features Global Charity Jobs to help recruit fundraisers worldwide

first_img Howard Lake | 5 April 2011 | News SOFII (the Showcase of Fundraising Innovation and Inspiration) has partnered with Global Charity Jobs to feature its fundraising jobs to its international audience. Charities can now purchase a job advert that will appear on both websites.The partnership will also generate income for SOFII, which is a not-for-profit enterprise. The fees from adverts booked on both sites will be split between Global Charity Jobs and SOFII, with the minimum of work on its part.Ken Burnett, SOFII Founder comments: “Despite uncertainties in many markets there are still some great opportunities internationally for creative fundraisers. The difficulty is finding them and that’s where Global Charity Jobs comes in. Now, through this great new partnership, SOFII and GCJ can help to unite some of the best opportunities around with many of the world’s most committed and inspirational fundraising professionals.”Daryl Upsall, Global Charity Jobs owner, added: “We are proud to have teamed up with SOFII to both help reach even more fundraisers around the world who are seeking new a new professional challenge whilst raising funds for the excellent SOFII Foundation and its invaluable work”.www.sofii.org AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis SOFII features Global Charity Jobs to help recruit fundraisers worldwide  19 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies Digital Recruitment / people About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Vilsack Releases Two Climate Reports in Paris

first_img While in Paris Wednesday as part of the United Nations climate change talks, USDA Secretary Tom Vilsack released two climate-related reports. One report, released by the White House Council on Environmental Quality, highlights the President Barack Obama administration’s progress on sustainable land use over the past six years, according to the Hagstrom Report. The second report, “Climate Change, Global Food Security, and the U.S. Food System,” identifies the effects of climate change on global food security through 2100.Vilsack discussed the challenges that the United States has faced during his tenure, including the drought in the western states, and how USDA has addressed them. He says “we’ve seen increasing incursions of invasive pests and diseases and extreme weather, everything from bark beetle to severe droughts, which have cost billions in lost productivity.” Vilsack says world agriculture faces unprecedented challenges in the face of climate change. He said education of farmers and ranchers is the first step in dealing with climate change. By Gary Truitt – Dec 2, 2015 Previous articleFarm Trade Surplus Shrinking to 10-Year Low on ImportsNext articleHighway Bill will Reverse Crop Insurance Cuts Gary Truitt Facebook Twitter Home Indiana Agriculture News Vilsack Releases Two Climate Reports in Paris SHARE Facebook Twitter SHARE Vilsack Releases Two Climate Reports in Parislast_img read more

Zoning Committee’s recommendation doesn’t threaten off-campus housing

first_img + posts ReddIt Student Body President Maddie Reddick advocates for students in front of the Zoning Commission during the meeting Sept. 7. TCU social work majors go into the field to help support Fort Worth’s homeless #CHEATEATS: Healthier Chocolate Milkshake Facebook printFour requirements that could have limited students’ off-campus housing were left out of an amendment approved by the Zoning Commission Wednesday.The Zoning Commission voted to approve an amendment of housing definitions to the City of Fort Worth Zoning Ordinance during their meeting Wednesday afternoon.The amendment included a new definition for the term “single housekeeping unit” as well as several other revised or new housing definitions.The commission approved a definition for “single housekeeping unit” which included a descriptive paragraph regarding individuals who share a single lease agreement or own a property together and have “established ties and familiarity with each other,” according to the amendment.They did not approve the four presumptions proposed along with the description which, if true for any resident, would have implied the house wasn’t functioning as a single housekeeping unit and make the resident unable to own or rent a house.The presumptions included a restriction on locks or deadbolts on any interior doors of the house, significant changes in number of residents over a 12-month period and members using a different address for legal registration. Also, sharing the house couldn’t be for temporary, seasonal, convenient or economic reasons.There were three potential options for how to proceed with the “single housekeeping unit” definition, said Dana Burghdoff, executive secretary of the Zoning Commission and assistant director of Planning and Development.The first option was to not add a definition at all. The second was to add the single descriptive paragraph as the definition, and the third was to add the paragraph including one or more of the four presumptions.The Zoning Commission voted in unanimous approval of the second option, which did not include the four presumptions.“I think it’s better government on our part to tell people what the criteria [of ‘single housekeeping unit’] is,” commission member and Vice Chair Charles Edmonds Jr., said. “I don’t think we should be doing it on a case-by-case basis.”“I don’t think we can digest these other four criteria,” he said. “Based on my knowledge of how the city operates, and how code enforcement operates, I see no way of enforcing those.”How to define “single housekeeping unit” has caused the most amount of comments and concern, Burghdoff said.   The city’s legal department wrote the proposed definition.“Single housekeeping unit” is a term found in the definition for “family,” another definition revised in the amendment. The term “family” applies to groups who live in all the types of residential areas in Fort Worth, Burghdoff said.The vote took place after two hours of passionate debate by community members. All three options were shown vehement support and opposition by representatives of neighborhood associations, landlords, realtors and other Fort Worth residents.Student Body President Maddie Reddick and four other TCU students were also present at the meeting. Reddick said the presumptions were “very concerning” to students and cited an online petition with over 1,800 signatures against them.Reddick said the presumptions would affect students, as most students don’t change their address for legal registration, are in Fort Worth seasonally for the school year and live with roommates for economic purposes.“I think it’s very apparent that TCU students are willing to work with the city,” Reddick said. “We’ve been working on a Good Neighbor program over the past year … and we want this relationship to continue to be stronger as we continue with Fort Worth.”Several Zoning Commission members expressed their support for the second option for the “single housekeeping unit” definition.“Clarity in definitions, I think, is extremely essential in this exercise,” commission member Carlos Flores said. “The ground rules, so to speak, need to be defined better.”He said the definitions weren’t trying to “single out” any specific population in the community, but were necessary for the city staff, students and other community members to rely on in the future.Flores said the four presumptions were well-intended, but could be problematic in the future and introduce unintended consequences.“I think [the second option] best represents a solution that most everyone can live with,” he said.Commission member Melissa McDougall also said she supported the second option. She said she was looking at the decision from multiple perspectives, including as a mother with a son who’s renting a home.“I think option two is a good median for all of us, and this is for all across Fort Worth,” McDougall said.The Zoning Commission’s recommendation will go to the City Council, which will vote on the amendment on Oct. 13. Kaitlin Helm Kaitlin Helmhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kaitlin-helm/ Kaitlin Helmhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kaitlin-helm/ Previous articleArtSouth: Encouraging local artists to bloom where plantedNext articleRenovated Colby Hall opens with new amenities Kaitlin Helm RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Kaitlin Helmhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kaitlin-helm/ Twitter ‘Liters for Life’ student campaign raises funds for global water crisis Campus Carry: What YOU need to know Kaitlin Helmhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/kaitlin-helm/ ReddIt Facebook Kaitlin is a senior journalism major from Portland, OR. She currently serves as the Managing Editor for IMAGE. Linkedin #CLEANEATS: “Fresh Start” Smoothie Loving thy neighbor: The TCU Overlay meets the Golden Rule Fort Worth’s first community fridge program helps serve vulnerable neighborhoods Linkedin Twitterlast_img read more

Patient experience is Look’s calling

first_imgOpinionColumnistsLocal News Patient experience is Look’s calling WhatsApp Facebook By Digital AIM Web Support – December 29, 2020 Facebook Pinterest TAGS  center_img Pinterest WhatsApp As Medical Center Hospital’s Associate Chief Experience Officer, Courtney Look handles more than just complaints and grievances.Look and her team, which includes two other staff members, also work to find ways to improve practices and problem solve.An Odessa native and Permian High School graduate, earned a degree in healthcare administration from Northeastern State University in Tahlequah, Okla., and completed a master’s certification in long-term care dementia and aging studies at Texas State University in San Marcos. She is enrolled in a master’s program in health care administration at Texas Tech University.Look knew she wanted to be in healthcare. She saw a cadaver once and realized the medical aspect wasn’t for her. But she really loved the business side of healthcare and became passionate about healthcare administration.During her graduate school studies in long-term care and dementia and aging studies, she found a passion for patients, people, processes and the care that affects them.Look worked in long-term care in Houston before returning to Odessa. Her job at Medical Center is similar to what she did in long-term care. She has been at the hospital for three years.She added that she really loved being on the long-term care side, but also loved the hospital side.“ For me, it’s a new role,” Look said. “It entails patient experience, performance improvement and infection prevention and quality. We do take complaints in our department, and of course, we try to be proactive.”If something comes up while a patient is at MCH, they want to resolve it before the patient goes home.Asked if her department, which has four people total, is extra busy right now, Look said they continue to stay busy.When someone has an issue, if a patient is in the health facility their process is to respond immediately and figure out if it was a miscommunication, whether something happened, and how to get the right people to resolve it immediately, Look said.“ Then if a patient calls after discharge, what we do is we intake their concern. Then we have a meeting and investigate with the team and area involved and then we follow up by letter with the patient. So that’s really our process for any kind of concern that comes through the health system,” Look said.She added that the patient experience process has stayed the same despite the pandemic. The calls are a little bit different.Sometimes they are called for general questions.“ Sometimes we get calls, can we send you pictures? Should we send something to our loved one? Can you get it to their room. I have their cell phone, or I have a blanket that they would really like to have. So I would say it looks a little bit different. We’re not always getting concerns and complaints. We’ll even get some praise and calls just saying I know this is hard for you guys on the inside as hard as it is for us on the outside and it’s hard not to be there with our loved ones, but we know you’re protecting us and we’re grateful,” Look said.Although you’d expect her department to get more of the negative calls, but that hasn’t been the case lately.“… We have received more positive words than we normally do during any time, even outside of the pandemic. It’s definitely a win when you get some of those coming in. It’s so easy to sympathize with families because in our department, even more than complaints and grievances, everything that we do revolves around patient experience,” Look said.“ We’re out there on the floor observing best practices. We’re implementing skills labs. We coach our teams at the bedside, really making sure we’re catching every process and experience that a patient goes through; looking at what does it look like, what does it sound like, what does it feel like for patients coming through,” she added.They consider how to talk to the patients’ family and let them know their loved one is safe and OK and not to panic. They tell the team not to call with wording that makes the family panic.“… We look out outside of our complaints and grievances to make sure that our teams are providing the best care, making sure that we’re always communicating to patients and families because for us right now communication is so much more important than it ever was. But we’re so used to having families at the bedside where we do a bedside shift report. That’s where teams go in and they talk with the patients at the bedside and they update them on the plan of care. Usually, there’s a family member there with most patients and so when the nurse leaves and the patient says, ‘I forget. What time did they say I was having surgery today?’ and the family may say, ‘Oh remember they did that … report this morning and you’re going to have surgery at noon today.’ …”Look said families help reinforce what the healthcare providers are saying, which helps.“… I think even more than that, we know families are so much a part of the healing process so for them to not be at the bedside regularly we know that that’s a challenge and we certainly sympathize with that,” Look said.Her department also offers input to other departments and administration based on what they have seen and heard.“ We do we analyze all the data that we have around experience. Then oftentimes we’ll create data, so if we look at patient feedback we trend what are they saying; how many times are they saying it; and then we prioritize things. We also create data by observing patients and patient flow. For example, we may watch a patient come into the ED (emergency department) and identify the time that they come in, what the process is and we follow it all the way along to their discharge. Then we’re able to identify what patient experience touch points do they have; what is the verbiage … we’re using. What policies and processes are touching the patient? Do they make sense? Do they cause a bottleneck or a hiccup? How do we make it a smooth transition and a win for not only our team, but every patient we serve that comes through …”Data from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems, or HCAPS survey, sent out to patients after coming to the hospital, is also considered.“ We definitely look at that data. We trend that data and that’s how we create a lot of our action plans and improvement opportunities,” Look said.Look is married to Andrew Davis, who also is from Odessa. She added that he is very supportive.“ It’s not every day that somebody at my age wakes up every day excited to go to work and really passionate about the work that they do and so they found their calling. But that is how I feel about this work and I’m so grateful for it …,” Look said.MCH Chief Nursing Officer Christin Timmons also is glad to have Look on board.“ Courtney has been a leader in our organization since starting. Courtney will lead our organization into great things and we are excited to have her expertise,” Timmons said.What makes Look stand out, Timmons said, is her “calm presence and firm commitment to patient satisfaction.” Twitter Twitter Previous article6 financial goals for 2021 and how to reach themNext articleSocial Engagement Digital AIM Web Supportlast_img read more

Top Democratic Lawmaker Wants More Information from Big Banks on Settlements

first_img Share Save  Print This Post Related Articles Previous: CFPB Considers Opening the Door for Class Action Lawsuits Next: Housing Market Sentiment Rises to Near-Record High Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago October 7, 2015 1,580 Views Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Tagged with: Big Banks Senator Sherrod Brown Settlements Sign up for DS News Daily Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Brian Honea Home / Daily Dose / Top Democratic Lawmaker Wants More Information from Big Banks on Settlements Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Sherrod BrownSen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio), ranking member of the Senate Banking Committee, has written a letter to more than a dozen big banks and investment banking firms requesting more information on settlement they have entered into with 15 government enforcement agencies since January 1, 2005.Brown wants to know if the banks are in compliance with their respective settlements and asked for information regarding the banks’ compliance procedures, particularly those initiated after the settlements; the amount of legal fees the banks paid; any sanctions imposed along with the names and positions of employees on which sanctions were imposed; and any non-public agreements the banks made with government enforcement agencies, according to a report from Bloomberg.”[A]t my direction as ranking member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, the Minority staff is reviewing issues related to the compliance with, and enforcement of, laws, statutes, regulations, and rules governing the operations of financial institutions,” Brown wrote in the letter, which was dated September 30, 2015.The recipients of the letters were not made public, but citing a “person familiar with the matter,” Bloomberg said the recipients included JPMorgan Chase, Citigroup, Morgan Stanley, Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Credit Suisse, and Deutsche Bank.”[A]t my direction as ranking member of the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, the Minority staff is reviewing issues related to the compliance with, and enforcement of, laws, statutes, regulations, and rules governing the operations of financial institutions.” Several of these institutions have entered into multi-billion dollar settlements with the government for their roles in mortgage meltdown and financial crisis, notably JPMorgan Chase ($13 billion in November 2013), Citi ($7 billion in July 2014), and Bank of America ($16.65 billion in August 2014). These institutions are regularly checked by independent monitors to ensure they are complying with the terms of their respective settlements.Brown listed his staff investigator Bob Roach as the contact for the letter recipients, which may be troubling to the banks since Roach is known for his investigations on such firms as Goldman Sachs and Deutsche Bank as a member of the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations, according to reports. Brown has requested that the banks deliver the information he is seeking on or before October 28.Also, according to reports, despite using the Senate Banking Committee letterhead, a spokesperson for the Committee said that Brown’s letter was not sanctioned by the Committee. The letter was not signed by Committee Chairman Richard Shelby (R-Alabama).To view a copy of the letter, click here. Top Democratic Lawmaker Wants More Information from Big Banks on Settlements Subscribe in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Big Banks Senator Sherrod Brown Settlements 2015-10-07 Brian Honea Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agolast_img read more

Mother Nature Impacting Housing Relocation Choices

first_img  Print This Post The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily Share Save Previous: Rates and Prices Pushing Affordability Out of Reach Next: Forbearances Drop for Fifth Consecutive Week Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago About Author: Eric C. Peck A new report from Redfin has found that an increasing number of Americans are factoring in the climate when deciding where to live. Out of the 2,000 respondents surveyed, Redfin found that 628 planned on moving in the next year. People aged 35- to 44-years-old were most likely to say that natural disasters, extreme temperatures, and/or rising sea levels played a role in their decision to move, followed by respondents aged 25- to 34-years-old. Respondents aged 45 or older were less likely to indicate that these risks factored into their decision to relocate.”Climate change is making certain parts of the country less desirable to live in,” said Redfin Chief Economist Daryl Fairweather. “As Americans leave places that are frequently on fire or at risk of going underwater, the destinations that don’t face those risks will become increasingly competitive and expensive for homebuyers.”Nearly 80% of the 2,000 polled by Redfin said that increasing frequency or intensity of natural disasters in an area would make them hesitant to purchase a home there. A slightly lower share—approximately 75%—would be hesitant to buy a home in a place with extreme temperatures and/or rising sea levels. Nearly 25% said they wouldn’t consider moving to an area with extreme temperatures, even if it were more affordable than a comparable area without such risk. The share was slightly higher—28% and 30%, respectively—when Redfin asked about natural disasters and rising sea levels.Regionally, respondents in the Midwest were the least likely to say that climate-change risks were a factor in their decision to relocate. Slightly more than 40% of respondents in the Midwest said the increasing frequency or intensity of natural disasters played a role in their decision to move in the next year, compared with more than half of respondents in other regions.Many have left the Napa, California region due to an increase in wildfires in recent years, according to Redfin Real Estate Agent Christopher Anderson.”After wildfires destroyed much of Napa in 2017, the community rallied together and rebuilt, but when fires ravaged our area again in 2020, some folks just decided they were done,” Anderson said. “I had one client in St. Helena whose home burned down in the last fire and only half of it was covered by the insurance company. She relocated to New York.”Five Star’s Disaster Preparedness 2021 Virtual Experience will be held Wednesday, July 14, 2021. Not another webinar or Zoom call, Disaster Preparedness 2021 is a business immersion experience in a full-scale virtual conference environment, complete with an expo hall, breakout sessions, and interactive networking opportunities. This year’s agenda features six educational panels covering topics regarding the COVID-19 pandemic, technology, regulatory insights, extreme weather, risk mitigation, and more. Click here for more information on Five Star’s Disaster Preparedness 2021 Virtual Experience. in Daily Dose, Featured, Journal, News The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Tagged with: Christopher Anderson Daryl Fairweather Five Star’s Disaster Preparedness 2021 Virtual Experience Natural Disasters Redfin Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Eric C. Peck has 20-plus years’ experience covering the mortgage industry, he most recently served as Editor-in-Chief for The Mortgage Press and National Mortgage Professional Magazine. Peck graduated from the New York Institute of Technology where he received his B.A. in Communication Arts/Media. After graduating, he began his professional career with Videography Magazine before landing in the mortgage space. Peck has edited three published books and has served as Copy Editor for Entrepreneur.com. Mother Nature Impacting Housing Relocation Choices April 5, 2021 856 Views Home / Daily Dose / Mother Nature Impacting Housing Relocation Choices Christopher Anderson Daryl Fairweather Five Star’s Disaster Preparedness 2021 Virtual Experience Natural Disasters Redfin 2021-04-05 Eric C. Peck Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 1 day ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 1 day ago Subscribelast_img read more

IFA says any inter-party deal on Irish Water must also recognise group water schemes

first_img Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th WhatsApp Twitter Facebook Twitter 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Homepage BannerNews Facebook Google+ Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal As Irish Water continues to loom over discussions on the formation of a minority government, the parties are being urged not to forget people in rural areas who are on group water schemes.Thomas Cooney is the IFA’s Environment and Rural Affairs Chairman, andn following discussions with group scheme representatives from Donegal and elsewhere, he says there is agreement across the board that the issue of group schemes cannot be allowed slip out of view.Mr Cooney says when Irish Water was established, the subvention to group schemes was cut, and if water charges are suspended, people on group schemes must also be given a break…………Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/cooneysat.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Previous articlePatterson on target for Derry CityNext articleDonegal Census coordinators hoping for 100% return rate on forms admin center_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Pinterest WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest By admin – April 23, 2016 Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North IFA says any inter-party deal on Irish Water must also recognise group water schemes Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan firelast_img read more

The right of way

first_imgSkip Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Lee said, too, that four-wheelers are sometimes a nuisance, but that’s a problem that needs to be solved some way other than closing the road that is used by residents of Pike and Bullock County.“Farnell Road is a farm-to-market road,” she said. “It’s a two-county road. I think that we can find a way to solve any problems without closing the road and inconveniencing so many people on both ends of the road.”Lee said a major concern is that closing the road would mean that, if the Meeksville Volunteer Fire Department was needed as a backup in an emergency situation, the response time would be greater due to having to “go the long way around.”Suzanne Johnson, who also lives at the Bullock County end of the road, said efforts have been made to encourage good stewardship of the road.“Too many people enjoy this road for it to close,” she said. “We’ll all be glad to work with the Deans and Pirnies to get the problems solved. We’ll be glad to help do anything we can to keep the road open.”Johnson said four or five petitions are being circulated in Pike and Bullock counties in opposition to the closing of the road.“We want the Pike County Commission to know how many people will be affected if this road is closed,” she said.Lee and Johnson attended a recent meeting of the Bullock County Commission to make the commissioners aware of the situation.Lee said Ron Smith, commission chair, contacted Harry Sanders, county administrator for Pike County, to express the commissions’ opposition to the closing of Farnell Road.Sanders said he was contacted by Smith and Commissioner Alonzo Ellis and both expressed opposition to vacating the road.“I’ve had quite a few calls regarding Farnell Road, and there’s a lot of concern,” Sanders said.“Farnell Road is owned and maintained by the county.“ No knows how long it’s been a public road. I’ve heard that it dates back to the Civil War. It will be up to the Pike County Commission to determine whether there is sufficient reason to vacate the road or sufficient opposition to keep it open.”If the Commission votes to vacate the road, Sanders said the abutting land will become the property of the landowners.Pike County District I Commissioner Homer Wright said he has received several calls about the petition to vacate Farnell Road and also has talked with residents in both Pike and Bullock counties who will be affected.“When I first looked at the petition, I didn’t think it would be such a big problem, but there are a lot of things to consider,” he said. “One thing is emergency response time. Since Farnell Road is in my district, I’ll be the one to call the shots. I’m doing my homework. I’m looking at it from both sides.”The public hearing on the petition for the county to vacate 1.8 miles of Farnell Road will be at 5:15 p.m. Aug. 10 at the Pike County Health Department. Email the author Latest Stories By Jaine Treadwell “We know the road as the China Grove Loop,” Lee said. “So many people from our area of Bullock County drive Farnell Road for day-to-day use. And, it’s one of the prettiest roads around. It would be a shame to see it closed.”The Pike County Commission made notice to the public on June 3, 2009, a petition had been filed to vacate a 1.8-mile stretch of Farnell Road leading from China Grove to the edge of Bullock County. There is an alternate road from the area to China Grove, but it’s about two miles farther.The petition was signed by Robert M. Pirnie, Jeffery Lamar Dean, James Edwards Dean, Kelly Gray Dean, Dennis Lee Dean and Lesley O’Gwyn Pirnie. Book Nook to reopen A wonderful piece of China Grove.That’s the way Darlene Lee, a resident of Bullock County, described the picturesque dirt road that she often travels from her home to China Grove and then on to Troy.Farnell Road is a cut-through road to China Grove used by residents of the High Ridge area in Bullock County. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Acid Reflux (Watch Now)Healthy LifestyleIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Print Article Published 10:20 pm Monday, July 20, 2009 Sponsored Content Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… By The Penny Hoarder The right of way The Pirnies and Deans own the property on both sides of Farnell Road that is petitioned for closing.Jimmy Dean cited abuse of the road as the reason he joined the petition for the Pike County Commission to vacate the road.According to Dean, Farnell Road is a popular place for riding four-wheelers and horses.“The four-wheelers keep the road plowed and banks torn up and trash is thrown everywhere,” he said. “People are riding the road and drinking at all hours of the night. The road is a party place and it has gotten to the point that it needs to stop.” You Might Like ‘Tagalong’ with Girl Scouts Registration for the Girl Scouts of America will have a brand new flavor for girls in the Troy area this… read morelast_img read more

Spring concert offers original works

first_img Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Book Nook to reopen Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Published 9:48 pm Tuesday, March 29, 2011 Spring concert offers original works Sponsored Content The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Email the author By The Penny Hoarder Plans underway for historic Pike County celebrationcenter_img Skip Latest Stories By Jaine Treadwell You Might Like Memorial honors McNellis A reception will be held Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at Troy University’s Arboretum in memory of Niall McNellis, the 21-year-old… read more The Troy University Spring Choral Music Showcase Concert will feature a new work written by renowned choral composer Eric William Barnum.The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. Thursday at Park Memorial United Methodist Church in Troy.The concert is free and open to the public.The concert will feature the Concert Chorale, Collegiate Singers and the vocal jazz group, frequency. “The Troy University Choral Department had two opportunities to work with Greg Jasperse and frequency will perform several of his compositions that will be featured on their recording project, ‘Spirit and Soul: The Music of Greg Jasperse,’” Orlofsky said.The Collegiate Singers will perform works by Barnum, Moses Hogan, Paul Basler and Rene Clausen.The concert will close with a rousing piece, “Until I Found the Lord,” by Andre Thomas. “The Concert Chorale will present music by three renowned choral composers and conductors, Eric William Barnum, Rene Clausen and Andre Thomas,” said Diane Orlofsky, director of University Choirs.“We are pleased to be able to premiere a new work written by Eric Barnum that was commissioned by the Troy University Choral Department,” Orlofsky said. “‘Confessions’ is based upon the writings of St. Augustine as found in the tenth Book of Confessions. It has been pure joy to be able to bring this beautiful new work to life.”Orlofsky said the concert will celebrate the “year of the composer” in the Troy University Choral Department.In addition to several of Barnum’s compositions including the setting of the poem “A Red, Red, Rose” by Robert Burns, frequency will perform several compositions by Greg Jasperse, noted jazz vocalist and composer. Print Article Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more