RPA calls out GRDB over Panama rice mix-up

first_imgThe Guyana Rice Producers Association (RPA) is flaying the Guyana Rice Development Board (GRDB) along with Agriculture Minister Noel Holder following Panama’s rejection of several containers of rice.The RPA said the responsible parties should take immediate measures to have the situation rectified.The authorities in Panama rejected several containers of rice following a mix-up with the shipment. One of the reasons for the rejection is that the shipment contained parboiled rice. There were more than 700 tons of parboiled rice packed in 20lbs bags in the containers.The RPA said it boggles the mind to even contemplate how over 700 tons of parboiled rice could have passed through the various quality and quantity checks and customs inspections and arrive in Panama, which is a white rice import market.“The contracted party (the seller) is the Guyana Rice Development Board (GRDB) for this particular market. The GRDB, in order to fulfill its contractual obligations, purchases rice from millers in order to supply this market. Notably, the GRDB charges millers US$8 per unit for inspection and to certify the quality and quantity supplied.The rice is even checked during the processing at the mills by the GRDB. The bags are then packed into the containers under the watchful eyes of the GRDB officers, samples are then taken and sent to the GRDB Head Office laboratories that are ISO certified, along with the number of the containers and the containers’ seal numbers.Further, the final sample is used for the preparation of the export grade certificate. The GRDB is the buyer of the rice from the millers, the agency is also responsible for certifying the quality and quantity and they are the contracted party to export to Panama,” the RPA said via a statement on Friday.Panama is currently Guyana’s best market with the best price and according to the Association, this fiasco has the potential to threaten the continuation of selling to that market, which would be a great financial loss to the farmers. The RPA said the GRDB can also lose its ISO certification, which will be a further blow to the rice industry.last_img read more

Gilles Marchand Marko Filli and Tonio Portughese

first_imgGilles Marchand, Marko Filli and Tonio PortugheseThe European Broadcasting Union (EBU), the organisation that represents European public broadcasters, has unveiled its new executive board line-up, with three new additions.The new board members are Gilles Marchand, Marko Filli and Tonio Portughese.Marchand was named as the new director of Swiss pubcaster SRG SSR last month ahead of taking up his new role in October 2017.Filli has served as director-general of RTV Slovenia since 2010, while Portughese has been chair of Maltese pubcaster PBS since 2013.Standing down from the board are Alexander Wrabetz of Austria’s ORF and Faïçal Rachid Laraïchi of Morocco’s SNRT.The executive board will continue to be led by Jean-Paul Philippot of Belgium’s RTBF and Monica Maggioni of Italy’s Rai, who were elected earlier this year to serve as president and vice-president respectively for the 10-year term from 2017-27.The 11-member executive board is responsible for ensuring the implementation of the EBU’s strategy and policies.last_img read more

New smartphone app helps anorexic patients to normalize their eating rate

first_imgAnorexic patients can normalize their eating rate by adjusting food intake to feedback from a smartphone app. And in contrast to failing standard treatments, most regain a normal body weight, their health improves, and few relapse.” Reviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 13 2019Swedish scientists say that eating disorders should be considered just that – eating disorders, rather than mental disorders. The proof, they say, is in the eating.Professor Per Sodersten, lead author of an article in Frontiers in Neuroscience defending his pioneering method says: The approach is based on the theory that slow eating and excessive physical exertion, both hallmarks of anorexia, are evolutionarily conserved responses to short food supply that can be triggered by dieting – and reversed by practicing normal eating.Which came first: the diet or the anorexia?Attempts to treat anorexia as a mental illness have largely failed, claim the authors.”The standard treatment worldwide, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), targets cognitive processes thought to maintain the disorder. The rate of remission from eating disorders is at most 25% one year after CBT, with unknown outcomes in the long-term. Psychoactive drugs have proven even less effective.”According to Sodersten, we need to flip the perspective: to target eating behaviors that maintain dysfunctional cognitive processes.”This new perspective is not so new: nearly 40 years ago, it was realized that the conspicuous high physical activity of anorexia is a normal, evolutionarily conserved response – i.e., foraging for food when it is in short supply – that can be triggered dietary restriction.”In striking similarity to human anorexics, rats and mice given food only once a day begin to increase their running activity and decrease their food intake further to the point at which they lose a great deal of body weight and can eventually die.”More recently, the theory has been elaborated and validated by studies of brain function.”We find that chemical signaling in the starved brain supports the search for food, rather than eating itself,” reports Sodersten.How to eatTo prove that the evolutionary perspective works in practice, Sodersten and his team have put their money where their (patient’s) mouth is. Their private clinics – which reinvest 100% of profits into research and development – are now the largest provider of eating disorders services in Sweden.Related StoriesNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairStudy provides new insight into longitudinal decline in brain network integrity associated with aging”We first proposed teaching anorexics to eat back in 1996. At the time, it was thought that this was misplaced and even dangerous; today, no-one can treat patients with eating disorders in the Region of Stockholm without a program for restoring their eating behavior.”At the Mandometer clinics, the control of eating behavior is outsourced to a machine that provides feedback on how quickly to eat.”Subjects eat food from a plate that sits on a scale connected to their smartphone. The scale records the weight loss of the plate during the meal, and via an app creates a curve of food intake, meal duration and rate of eating,” explains Sodersten. “At regular intervals, a rating scale appears on the screen and the subject is asked to rate their feeling of fullness.””A reference curve for eating rate and a reference curve for the feeling of fullness are also displayed on the screen of the smartphone. The subject can thus adapt their own curves in real time to the reference curves, which are based on eating behavior recorded in healthy controls.”Through this feedback, patients learn to visualize what normal portions of food look like and how to eat at a normal rate.Satisfying resultsThe method has now been used to treat over 1500 patients to remission by practicing eating.”The rate of remission is 75% in on average one year of treatment, the rate of relapse is 10% over five years of follow-up and no patient has died.”This appears to be a vast improvement compared to the current best standard treatment of CBT. All the more so, considering that overall Sodersten’s patients started off sicker than average.”The difference in outcome is so big that, according to our medical statistician, a randomized control trial [RCT] is now redundant. Nevertheless, we invite a head-to-head RCT by independent researchers – so far, there are no takers.”Source: FrontiersJournal reference: Södersten, P. et al. (2019) Eating Behavior and the Evolutionary Perspective on Anorexia Nervosa. Frontiers in Neuroscience. doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2019.00596.last_img read more

Opioids are major cause of pregnancyrelated deaths in Utah

first_imgThe cost of that mistaken perception is evident in a study that Smid has just published entitled, Pregnancy-Associated Death in Utah: Contribution of Drug-Induced Deaths. It highlights the unrecognized price Utah’s mothers are paying in the midst of the state’s opioid epidemic. Mothers who have a history of substance use disorders often relapse in the first year after childbirth. In total 35 Utah women fatally overdosed on drugs (74% were from opioids), between 2005 and 2014, making drug-induced deaths the top cause of pregnancy-associated deaths in the state. The vast majority (80%) of deaths occurred in the late postpartum period, between 43 days and one year after the birth, after most women have had their one postpartum check.Utah has long been in the grip of an opioid epidemic, from 2013 to 2015 ranking seventh in the U.S. for overdose deaths. It also has the highest rate of any state in the nation, at 42 percent, of pregnant women insured by Medicaid prescribed opioids, according to 2007 data.If more postpartum women are not to be lost to drugs, Smid urges that deep changes need to be wrought in terms of both public perception and treatment. “We have a huge problem,” Smid says. “Our moms are dying in Utah, a state which says it values family above all else.”Rethinking addictionSocietal norms may demand complete abstinence from mothers with substance use history to ensure a child born free of addiction. According to Smid, women with substance use issues do try to stop drug use during pregnancy. “Reproductive age women who do drugs, for whatever reason, when they get pregnant, they stop or decrease substance use when pregnant, but once they have their babies, many relapse.”OBGYN providers generally see mothers 1–2 times within the six weeks after the birth. “Six months in and the baby is still screaming, and it takes a toll on moms,” says Smid, in terms of the long-term follow-up with moms. And from the provider perspective, “many don’t know the mom was doing drugs or had a history or was in remission when pregnant because maybe they didn’t ask and the mom didn’t disclose.”While the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists now recommends ongoing postpartum or “fourth trimester care” rather than the post-birth single visit, the lack of providers nationwide versed in pregnancy and addiction is disturbing. There are only about four double-boarded maternal fetal medicine specialists who are also addiction medicine boarded in the U.S. says Smid, and she’s one of the four. “We don’t have that many people truly focused on pregnant and postpartum moms with addiction, which is incredible since it’s one of our most common conditions. It’s more common than type 1 diabetes.”Smid finds parallels between opioid addiction and diabetes instructive. In both cases, she says 10 to 20 percent of patients with chronic diabetes or opioid use disorder successfully come off their meds. “The vast majority need medication to stabilize their brain. Their bodies lack natural endorphins, or the circuitry is altered so much that natural production isn’t enough to make them stable.”Related StoriesNew research examines whether effects of alcohol/pregnancy policies vary by racePDFNJ campaign emphasizes the hazards of prescription opioidsResearchers survey orthopedic providers to understand factors that drive opioid prescribing practicesYet none of the women in the study were on methadone or buprenorphine to treat opioid addiction. Smid argues that postpartum moms with opioid use disorder history should stay on their medications, stay in therapy, and not taper off, something that even patients have been conditioned to expect.”Do not think about tapering until kids are at least a year old,” Smid says. “Sometimes you don’t ever. Tpering may never be an option for you. You have a chronic life-threatening condition. Your brain may just need it.” She argues that since providers do not typically require patients to taper their diabetes medication, why force them to taper their medications for opioid addiction? “If more people thought about addiction like diabetes, we’d be in a better place. The vast majority of people need to be on medication for the rest of their lives.”Missed opportunitiesWhen Smid would ask patients about their first time on drugs many would say it was when they first felt normal, even happy, like they had emotions like everyone else. “It’s the first time it went from grey to color,” she says. “Your brain doesn’t make enough dopamine. You’ve added a substance that makes you feel great. That’s why it’s called ‘chasing the dragon.’ You want that feeling back.”Patients are at a moderate or high risk of developing addiction depending on their genes. “Most of our patients have family history of addiction that is deep on both sides,” Smid says. “You get exposure to drugs, you experiment with drugs, and if you have that physiology you’re throwing a match into kindling.”The study also highlights how society’s traditional view of people with addictions as shuffling derelicts strung out on the street is far from accurate. “People look at addicts and think they’re living on the streets, popping from one motel room to another,” Stephanie says.While women on State Street, North Temple, and Pioneer Park, living chaotic lives trading sex for drugs, are the most visible example of addiction, they are the minority in terms of reproductive-age women using opioids, Smid says. “The majority of the moms live in houses, they look like the moms in the mommy group. They live in cul-de-sacs, they work, they keep their jobs.”More than half of women who died in Smid’s study were sent home with their babies, Stephanie says, who read the study at University of Utah Health public affairs office’s request. “You don’t get sent home if the hospital or state think there’s a problem.” Which means, Stephanie says, that women are either not being screened for addiction and other histories, or are hiding them from their providers.All that said, Smid notes, Division of Child and Family Services does a full assessment “and determines safety for mom and baby. The perception is that the state takes your baby if you do drugs. That’s not always the case.”Postmortem, Smid found, providers didn’t know their patients had a history of overdose, substance use, and suicide attempts. “We’re not systematically asking every mom. We might ask the mom in Pioneer Park, but do you ask the Cottonwood Heights mom?” Sometimes providers do not ask their patients, because they don’t know what to do, Smid continues. “We have to train our providers in perinatal addiction care. They’re not automatically screening for substance use, mental health conditions and that’s a huge missed opportunity for us as providers to intervene and prevent these deaths. The system also needs to be able to respond to moms and have women-centered treatment facilities where moms can enter treatment with their children.”The study details numerous examples of other missed opportunities to identify pregnant women with drug use history in the system. A quarter of the women had a prior history of overdosing, yet none of them had had counseling regarding preventing overdose or a prescription for Narcan (Naloxone). Despite mental health and drug misuse, most of the women had not received mental health or drug treatment.The lack of screening for drug history is about to change. Smid has been training clinicians at U of U Health to implement the National Institute on Drug Abuse Quick Screen. The screening means providers, through a series of questions about alcohol, cigarette, and drug use, can both learn more about the patient and broach the potentially sensitive topic of prescription and opioid drug misuse. She and the U of U Health team are working to roll-out system-wide screening for every pregnant woman.Stephanie underscores how life-changing long-term treatment and recovery is. “This is like my fifteenth chance and I’m very grateful where I am right now,” she says. “I’m in a better place than I have been in my life since I was 10 years old.” Source:University of Utah HealthJournal reference:Smid, M. et al. (2019) Pregnancy-Associated Death in Utah: Contribution of Drug-Induced Deaths. Obstetrics & Gynecology. doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000003279. Addiction has been constructed as a social problem. Medicine is catching up that it’s truly a life-threatening, chronic medical condition.”Marcela Smid, M.D., medical director of University of Utah Health’s Substance Use in Pregnancy Recovery Addiction Dependence Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Jun 28 2019Stephanie lay in the Salt Lake County jail bunk bed and thought, “Everything would be better if I just died.”She was a burden to everyone she knew, and no one could trust her. She’d pawned her mom’s wedding ring, stolen her sister’s jewelry. There was nothing she wouldn’t do–or steal–to stave off the desperation, the seizures, and overwhelming sickness that assaulted her body every time she was “jonesing” for heroin. (Stephanie requested anonymity to share her story.)Sexually molested and raped as a child, she’d started using drugs when she was 13, while growing up in Springville and Provo. It wasn’t until she went to prison for drug-related crimes that she decided rather than dying, she wanted to change. “Me going to prison is what saved my life,” says the 37-year-old. She took up healthy habits, running every day in the women’s circular yard.But paroling from prison was one thing, transitioning back into society another. After a stint in the Orange Street halfway house for women, she lived in a tiny apartment with only a blanket and pillow–no food, no TV, or phone–while working as a server in a Mexican restaurant. She met her subsequent husband on Trax. He was working on his recovery from addiction using Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone), medication used in opioid replacement therapy. The couple relapsed and lived off scamming cash from stores with discarded receipts.Two more stints in prison and Stephanie and her partner couldn’t figure out how to turn their lives around. They would buy Suboxone from a dealer on the street, but when she found herself pregnant, she was terrified the state would take her baby away. Her doctor told her to aggressively taper the medication, but that only led to her craving heroin.Stephanie called Marcela Smid, M.D., the medical director of University of Utah Health’s Substance Use in Pregnancy Recovery Addiction Dependence (SUPeRAD), a specialty prenatal clinic for women with substance use issues.”I need to get off this,” she told Smid.”Don’t do anything,” Smid pleaded with her. “Stay on it. You’re stable on the medication and that is the most important thing you can do for you and your baby.”Fast forward 18 months and Stephanie has now been on the same dose of Suboxone for three years. Her one-year old scampers around the living room of her sparsely decorated Sandy home, while her husband is at work. “It’s sad,” she says. “There’s not a lot of help,” for pregnant women who are frightened of relapsing if they go off the treatment medication.While many providers and patients may view methadone or buprenorphine, two types of medications used to treat people with opioid use disorder, as a drug they need to be weaned off, Smid vehemently disagrees. Treating mothers helps to stabilize them and leads to the best outcomes for mother and infant.last_img read more

Girl power Allfemale teams compete at robotics event

Factories will have a need over the next decade for workers capable of operating and troubleshooting computer-directed machinery, including robots. Many of those future workers are in high school today and, if Kamen has his way, they will join—or start—a robotics team.”This is the only sport you’ll ever play where every kid on every team can turn pro,” he said.Valerie Alexander is one of those kids. The 14-year-old is a member of the Amazon Warriors, who qualified for the FIRST Championship in their rookie year.”I would definitely like to see more girls interested in this kind of thing,” Alexander said. “I think a big part of it is just to get the word out and to show people what it’s like.” In a photo from, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Detroit, a member of the Ontario-based Build a Dream Amazon Warriors, who bill themselves as Canada’s only all-female high school robotics team, prepare to compete at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. High school teams competed this year in a game called “Power Up,” in which they were tasked with building wheeled robots capable of maneuvering in an enclosed playing arena and picking up and transporting yellow power cubes. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) In a photo from, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Detroit, the Ontario-based Build a Dream Amazon Warriors, who bill themselves as Canada’s only all-female high school robotics team, prepare to compete at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. High school teams competed this year in a game called “Power Up,” in which they were tasked with building wheeled robots capable of maneuvering in an enclosed playing arena and picking up and transporting yellow power cubes. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) In a photo from, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Detroit, Ontario-based Build a Dream Amazon Warriors, who bill themselves as Canada’s only all-female high school robotics team that is mentored and advised solely by women, control their robot, 6875, during a competition recently for the biggest prize in the sport at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) In a photo from, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Detroit, the Ontario-based Build a Dream Amazon Warriors, who bill themselves as Canada’s only all-female high school robotics team, prepare to compete at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. High school teams competed this year in a game called “Power Up,” in which they were tasked with building wheeled robots capable of maneuvering in an enclosed playing arena and picking up and transporting yellow power cubes. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) Or at least how to get the process started.The Ontario-based Build a Dream Amazon Warriors were among the thousands of young people from nearly four-dozen countries competing recently for the biggest prize at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. The team members bill themselves as Canada’s only all-female high school robotics team mentored and advised by women.”You know, nerds are the future. And here, nerds rule,” said Yvonne Pilon, president and CEO of WEtech Alliance, which helped spearhead the growth of FIRST robotics in Windsor, the Canadian city near Detroit.High school teams competed this year in a game called “Power Up,” in which they were tasked with building wheeled robots capable of maneuvering in an enclosed playing arena and picking up and transporting yellow power cubes.Participation has swelled since FIRST’s inception nearly three decades ago, but founder Dean Kamen is still looking for more of those nerds—especially female ones.”I will be totally satisfied when the day comes that the number of girls on teams and the number of boys on teams is randomly, statistically identical,” said Kamen, an inventor who created FIRST—For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology—in 1989. Canada hasn’t cornered the market on girl power; several U.S. teams that competed in Detroit also featured all-female lineups.One of those, the Fe Maidens (pronounced “Iron Maidens,” playing off the chemical symbol for iron), traveled to Detroit from New York City.”When you walk around the pits, you see a lot of the teams, although they’re co-ed, they’re dominated by boys. And to have a team that’s all girls is something that we’re all very proud of,” said Colin Morrell, the team’s coach and a physics teacher at its school, the Bronx High School of Science.Team captain Natasha Stamler, who will head to MIT after a four-year career with the Maidens, has this advice for newcomers: “Try to build things. It can be wood. It can be metal. It doesn’t matter. … You’re really learning real-world skills.” © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. In a photo from, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Detroit, Valerie Alexander, right, works on the team’s robot at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. “You know, nerds are the future. And here, nerds rule,” said Yvonne Pilon, CEO of WEtech Alliance, which helped spearhead the growth of FIRST robotics in Windsor, the Canadian city that neighbors Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) Citation: Girl power: All-female teams compete at robotics event (2018, May 3) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-girl-power-all-female-teams-robotics.html Two Taiwanese teenagers win World Robot Olympiad in India In a photo from, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Detroit, Valerie Alexander works on the team’s robot at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. “You know, nerds are the future. And here, nerds rule,” said Yvonne Pilon, CEO of WEtech Alliance, which helped spearhead the growth of FIRST robotics in Windsor, the Canadian city that neighbors Detroit. While participation has swelled since FIRST’s inception nearly three decades ago, founder Dean Kamen is still looking for more of those nerds, especially female ones. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) Explore further In a photo from, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Detroit, Valerie Alexander, right, works on the team’s robot at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. “You know, nerds are the future. And here, nerds rule,” said Yvonne Pilon, CEO of WEtech Alliance, which helped spearhead the growth of FIRST robotics in Windsor, the Canadian city that neighbors Detroit. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) Half a dozen teenage girls from Canada know exactly how to narrow the skills gap. In a photo from, Thursday, April 26, 2018, in Detroit, a member of the Ontario-based Build a Dream Amazon Warriors, who bill themselves as Canada’s only all-female high school robotics team, prepare to compete at the FIRST Championship in Detroit. High school teams competed this year in a game called “Power Up,” in which they were tasked with building wheeled robots capable of maneuvering in an enclosed playing arena and picking up and transporting yellow power cubes. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio) This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

PayPal move blocks sales of school shooting video game

first_img Explore further Citation: PayPal move blocks sales of school shooting video game (2018, June 20) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-06-paypal-blocks-sales-school-video.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Active shooter drills may reshape how a generation of students views school Acid Software said Tuesday that purchases of “Active Shooter” were temporarily suspended as it tried to resolve the issues with PayPal. Acid’s Twitter postings included the hashtags “QuitCensoringUs” and “FreedomOfExpression.”A PayPal spokeswoman said Wednesday it doesn’t allow its services to be used to promote violence.”Active Shooter” allows players to participate in simulated school shootings and has drawn complaints by anti-gun violence advocates including parents of children killed in school shootings in Parkland, Florida, and Newtown, Connecticut.Acid recently had to set up new websites after video game marketplace Steam and crowdfunding site Indiegogo removed “Active Shooter” from its sites. © 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. The developer of a school shooting video game condemned by parents of slain children has lost the ability to sell the game online after being dumped by PayPal.last_img read more

Virender Sehwags wife Aarti accuses business partners of forgery

first_imgVirender Sehwag’s wife Aarti accuses business partners of forging sign to take Rs 4.5 crore loanAarti Sehwag said her business partners influenced creditors by using Virender Sehwag’s name and later forged her signatures on an agreement.advertisement Next India Today Web Desk New DelhiJuly 13, 2019UPDATED: July 13, 2019 11:32 IST Aarti Sehwag with her husband Virender Sehwag. (Photo:Twitter\Aarti Sehwag)HIGHLIGHTSAarti Sehwag has accused eight persons of taking loan without her knowledgeAarti has said the accused influenced creditors by using her husband Virender Sehwag’s nameAarti Sehwag is a partner in an agro-based companyFormer Indian cricketer Virender Sehwag’s wife has filed a cheating case against her business partners.In her complaint to the police last month, Aarti Sehwag alleged that her business partners forged her signature to take a loan of Rs 4.5 crore from another firm and later defaulted on the payment.”The accused persons approached the creditors without any consent and knowledge of the complainant … and availed loan of Rs 4.5 crore from them,” Aarti alleged.She said the accused influenced the creditors by using her husband Virender Sehwag’s name and later forged her signatures on the tripartite agreement.Two postdated cheques were issued to the creditors. The firm later failed to pay back the loan amount.”Due to the default, the creditors invoked the arbitration clause and filed a complaint in the court. During the proceeding, it was shocking for the complainant to see her signature and partite agreement, which she had never signed,” it added.Based on Aarti’s complaint, the police has registered an FIR against the accused under Sections 420 (cheating and dishonestly), 468 (forgery), 471 (using as genuine a forged document) and 34 (common intention) of the Indian Penal Code.Virender and Aarti got married in 2004.(With inputs from ANI)READ | Former Arunachal Pradesh CM booked on charges of corruption, cheatingWATCH | FIR against Himachal Pradesh Cricket AssociationFor the latest World Cup news, live scores and fixtures for World Cup 2019, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for World Cup news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted bySumeda Tags :Follow Aarti SehwagFollow Virender Sehwaglast_img read more