Mother, Son Found Guilty of Murder

first_imgThe abstention of three of the 12 member jury of Criminal Court ‘A’ last week could not save Madam Kou Saye and her son Ziekal Gbokolo from being found guilty of killing Faith Gee.The incident took place in December 2014, in the 72nd Community, outside of Monrovia.The controversial decision came after the jury had stayed in their chamber deliberating for over two hours before returning with their verdict.Nine members of the jury informed the court that the defendants were guilty, while the remaining three abstained.Before the verdict, Judge Boima Kontoe told the jurors that they were required to “fully and carefully examine the testimonies and physical evidence to arrive at your verdict. It is your duty to discuss the case with each other in your deliberation to reach a verdict.”The case started when the prosecution alleged that in the early hours of a day in December 2014 in the 72nd Community in Paynesville, Faith Gee, also known as Bob Blue, was on his way from an all night church service, when co-defendant Saye and her son Gbokolo saw him and began to scream “Rogue! Rogue!” Later, the prosecution said, they attacked him with a 2 by 2 plank and cutlasses, inflicting several injuries on him from which he bled profusely and later died at a local clinic.Besides Madam Saye and her son, several others, including Arthur Kassay, John Moore, Andrew Kartay, Saah and Ma Ruth – who are still on the run – after hearing the noise, jumped out of their houses and began to assault Gee. Co-defendant Arthur used the back of a cutlass and slapped Faith twice on his back. He later dragged him to a basketball court, before the victim was picked up by other church members, who took him to a local hospital.Judge Kontoe has up to a week to announce their punishment.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Jamaica Successful in Bid for Seat on Another UNESCO Committee

first_img The Jamaican delegation was led by the Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Honourable Olivia Grange. Press Release – Jamaica has been successful in securing a place on yet another high-profile UNESCO Committee. Press Release – Jamaica has been successful in securing a place on yet another high-profile UNESCO Committee.The country was elected unopposed to a seat on the Intergovernmental Committee of the Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH), at the General Assembly of the Convention which ended on June 6 in Paris, France.The Jamaican delegation was led by the Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Honourable Olivia Grange.In reacting to the successful bid, Minister Grange said:“Jamaica expresses its sincere thanks for the overwhelming support we have received. We are heartened by the show of camaraderie particularly by St. Kitts and Nevis, who withdrew and in the end provided full backing for Jamaica to sit on the Committee. We do not take this level of support for granted”.The following 12 countries are now members of the Committee:Group I – The NetherlandsGroup II – Azerbaijan, PolandGroup III – JamaicaGroup IV – China, Japan, Kazakhstan, Sri LankaGroup V(a) – Cameroon, Djibouti, TogoGroup V (b) – KuwaitThe election to the Committee marks the first time Jamaica is to serve on this prestigious UNESCO body. Having earlier this year seen the election of Minister Grange to the UNESCO Executive Board and her selection as Chair of the Conventions and Recommendations Committee, Jamaica now stands tall in thehalls of this hallowed World Cultural powerhouse.It was only last November that Jamaica completed a successful four-year mandate on the World Heritage Committee.In addressing the General Assembly, Minister Grange encouraged countries that are party to the Convention to make every effort to build capacity within local communities to increase sustainable development for creative practitioners, culture bearers and the community at large.The Minister emphasised the role which Jamaica’s intangible heritage has played in shaping the country’s identity and in providing economic benefits to communities and individuals in Jamaica.She told the General Assembly:“Jamaica is proud of the fact that the musical heritage of the Maroons has been recognised through its inscription in 2008. We also look forward to future inscriptions of our Reggae music and the new religion of Rastafari, which we have given the world. Jamaica encourages all countries to seek to work towards recognition of their indigenous elements through inscription”.The 13th session of the ICH Committee will take place in Mauritius in November 2018 where Jamaica’s submission for the inscription of Reggae music on the Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity will be considered. Story Highlights The country was elected unopposed to a seat on the Intergovernmental Committee of the Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage (ICH), at the General Assembly of the Convention which ended on June 6 in Paris, France.last_img read more